Aug 04, 2020  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course numbers are ordered with the first digit of a course number indicates the class level of the course. Permission to take sophomore courses is granted to freshmen provided they have met the prerequisites. Junior and senior level courses are considered upper-division courses with numbers in the 300s and 400s.

The following set of courses constitutes the core curriculum outlined in the Degree and Core Curriculum Information  section. Course descriptions are provided here for those core courses not contained among the offerings of academic departments. Core courses offered by particular departments are indicated here only by title and a cross-reference to the departmental listing where the full course description appears. All credit hours are stated in semester hours.

The ‘S’ and ‘W’ beside the course title in a major department indicates that the course satisfies the ‘speech intensive’ and the ‘writing intensive’ components of the core curriculum for that major.

Courses that satisfy core distribution requirements are listed in the Degree and Core Curriculum Information  section, and the course description will contain the appropriate code (e.g. see ART 111 Introduction to Art with FAR):

FAR - Fine arts distribution requirement
HUM - Humanities distribution requirement
LAB - Natural science lab distribution requirement
SSC - Social science distribution requirement

 
  
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    HIS 313 History & Expansion of Christianity II


    This course surveys Christian history from the era of the European Renaissance and Reformation of the sixteenth century, the establishing of the Protestant tradition, the eventual Wars of Religion, the transmission of Christianity to the western hemisphere and Asia by trade, colonization, and the rise of the eighteenth century missionary movement. The effects on world Christianity of de-colonization and the major military conflicts of the twentieth-century are especially noted. The future of Christianity as an increasingly non-Western and Global South movement will be noted in detail. Pre- or Co-requisite(s): BIB 277  or BIB 278   Cross-listed as BIB 303 . 3 hour(s). HUM.
  
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    HIS 314 America in the Revolutionary Age


    A study of late colonial America from the early 1700s through the Revolution and to the eve of the establishment of the new government under the Constitution. Specific attention will be given to the ideological, economic, political and religious origins of the Revolution. Prerequisite(s): HIS 111  or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 316 Recent American History: 1960s


    An in-depth study of the “long decade” of the 1960s in the history of the United States. The course will focus on social, cultural, diplomatic, political, and economic forces from the mid-1950s to the early 1970s that helped shape modern American society. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 317 The American Civil War Era


    A course which will focus on sectionalism, slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction during the mid-nineteenth century. An important focus of this course will be on the political, social, and cultural issues that led to the war. Prerequisite(s): HIS 111  or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 319 Progressive Era America


    Between 1890 and 1920, Americans experienced an aggressive cultural shift as the United States transitioned into a new century. During this period the individuals known as “progressives” confronted the wrongs plaguing the country. The national movement advocated reform through educational, political, environmental, cultural, and social reform. Although not unified in their particular agendas these leaders promoted reform through both government and grassroots efforts. This class will seek to survey the issues that marked the Progressive Era in America. Prerequisite(s): HIS 112  or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 321 History of Modern Japan


    A survey of the history of Japan since 1600, with a focus on the period since 1800. Consideration will be given to social, cultural, political, diplomatic, and economic transformations with a particular emphasis on the interchange between Japan and its regional neighbors and the interaction between Japan and the West. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 322 History of Modern China


    A survey of the history of China since the 1600s, with a focus on the period since 1800. Consideration will be given to political, diplomatic, social, cultural, and economic transformations with a particular emphasis on the interchange between China and its regional neighbors and the interaction between China and the West. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 325 Twentieth-Century World History


    A survey of political, economic, social, and cultural factors that shaped world history during the twentieth century. Special consideration will be given to the ideas, institutions, events, and social processes that helped create the modern global order. Prerequisite(s): COR 226  or HIS 214 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 327 History of South Africa


    An historical study of the southern regions of Africa from the age prior to the first Dutch settlement in 1652 through the dissolution of Apartheid in the early 1990s. The course explores the diversity of indigenous people groups in southern Africa, the nature and growth of European settlements in Africa, and the modern struggle for political power in South Africa. Close attention will be paid to the Afrikaner ideology of Baaskap, the political implementation of Apartheid and the long history of black resistance. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 328 Developing World Since 1945


    An exploration of post-WWII events and trends in regions collectively known as the “developing world”: Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and significant portions of Asia. In addition to internal concerns such as ethnic rivalry and political volatility, the course also considers the emergence of complex socio-economic relationships between “developing” and “developed” nations. A significant component of the course will be the discussion and analysis of current global events. Prerequisite(s): HIS 325 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 330 American Environmental History


    A survey of the environment’s influence on humans and their institutions, and the impact of humans and their institutions on the environment over the course of American history. The course will focus on key themes in American environmental history. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 332 Modern Middle East


    A study of the modern Middle East focusing on the influence of Islam, oil and Israel on the Arab world since 1800. Topics to be studied in depth include imperialism and nationalism; problems of modernization and development; the Arab-Israeli conflict; the global politics of oil; the Iranian revolution; and Islamic revivalism. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 335 The European Enlightenment


    Modernity is a complex intellectual historical issue among scholars. This course will attempt to understand some of the traits of modernity by examining major historiographical interpretations of the European Enlightenment as a social, political, religious, philosophical, and intellectual movement. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 336 Darwin


    The main purpose of this course is to understand the utilitarian and Victorian worldviews of nineteenth-century England. Using Charles Darwin’s autobiography and his diary, the student will reconstruct the utilitarian worldview of Darwin. The student is also responsible to understand how that worldview fits into the natural religion and political theory of Victorian England. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 339 Renaissance and Reformation


    The course will examine Europe in the 14th through 16th centuries in which there occurred simultaneously three great movements: the cultural and literary Renaissance emanating from Italy, the European reconnaissance of the world’s oceans pioneered by Portugal and Spain, and the Reformation of the Christian religion sparked by the Lutheran movement. Emphasis will be placed on the social setting common to all. Prerequisite(s): HIS 213  or HIS 214 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 340 20th Century U.S. Foreign Relations


    A study of the history of U.S. foreign relations in the twentieth century. Attention will be given to a variety of influences that shape American policy, including Wilsonian ideas, Republican internationalism, containment and America’s ascendancy in the 20th century. Prerequisite(s): HIS 112 or junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 349 American Urban History


    A study of the development of urban America since the colonial period, with particular emphasis on the history of the city since the late nineteenth century. The course will focus on how and why urbanization developed and how it increasingly influenced the structure of the American nation. Themes of race, ethnicity, class, industrialization, poverty, popular culture, leisure, work, and politics will be considered in an effort to understand the societal changes which develop from the growth of urbanization in the United States. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 350 Summer Reading Seminar


    Guided readings in historical topics. 1-3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 351 History and Culture of African Americans to 1865


    This course is an historical examination of the important experiences and achievements of African Americans. Primary attention will be given to the cultural, religious, social and political structures that have given shape to the history of African Americans. In the movement from Africa, to slavery and freedom in America, we will evaluate the successes and failures of selected African American groups and individuals that unfold the fabric of this history. 3 hour(s). HUM.
  
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    HIS 352 History and Culture of African Americans since 1865


    African-American History from the Civil War to the present is a multi-disciplinary study surveying the African-American experience and emphasizing, historical, sociological, cultural, economic, and psychological issues in the study of African Americans since 1865. 3 hour(s). HUM.
  
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    HIS 370 History and Philosophy of American Education


    An overview of the leading ideas and institutional developments that have shaped the character of American education. Of particular interest are the influence of Puritanism on education, the rise of the public school movement, the legacy of John Dewey and the Progressive Movement, and the Christian school movement. Students will look at educational developments within their social, intellectual, and political contexts. Fee: $6. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 372 Modern Africa


    An overview of the African continent since 1800 that considers many of its important physical, political, and cultural dimensions. Special consideration is given to the impact of Europe and the United States on African peoples, dimensions of European colonial rule, patterns of indigenous response to colonization, Western images and perceptions of African peoples, and the role Africa has played in shaping the modern world. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 390 Special Topics


    This course offers opportunities for study in various topics of interest within the field of history. These may be short-term courses offered during the semester or during the summer term. Topics will be decided upon by the history faculty as need and interest arise. Instructor determines credit hour(s).
  
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    HIS 398 North American Indians in American History


    An overview of the interaction between North American Indian cultures and Euro-American cultures over the last five hundred years of American history. The course focuses on key themes including cultural interaction, government policy, missionary efforts and Indian response, and the efforts of American Indians to maintain self-determination and sovereignty over the five hundred year period of interaction with Euro-American culture. Prerequisite(s): HIS 111 , HIS 112  or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 399 Historiography


    A course designed for historical studies majors in their junior year. The course involves readings and discussions of the issues and problems associated with the study and writing of history. Special attention is given to the issues involved in a Christian interpretation of history and to the writings of both Christian and non-Christian authors. This course both reflects back to courses already taken and prepares the history major for the writing of the Senior Integration Project. Required of all history majors. Prerequisite(s): HIS 150  and junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 400 Independent Study


    Independent study in history may be pursued by qualified students in accordance with established guidelines. Instructor determines credit hour(s).
  
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    HIS 401 Seminar in U. S. History


    Advanced studies in a selected topic in American History. This course is conducted as a seminar with a limited enrollment and consists of extensive reading accompanied by written and oral presentations by the student. Prerequisite(s): HIS 111 , HIS 112 , junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 409 Seminar in Modern History


    Study of topics in modern history. Normally this course involves considerable student participation through papers, reports, and discussions. Prerequisite(s): HIS 214  or HIS 325 , junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 411 History Internship


    Off-campus work that utilizes skills developed by academic study of History and is overseen by an organization or group recognized by the History and Politics Department. Prerequisite(s): HIS 150 , an overall GPA of 2.67 and a history GPA of 3.00 or better and at least one reference in the History and Politics Department who knows the quality of the student’s work and can speak to the student’s dependability and reliability. 1 per 40 - 45 hours of work, up to 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 491 Senior Seminar in History


    Work in this course is applied to the formulation and writing of the Senior Integration Project. During the semester, students will produce some short research projects, a polished SIP proposal, a sizable working SIP bibliography, and a substantial historiographic essay on the topic for their Senior Integration Projects involving thoughtful and critical evaluation of both primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite(s): HIS 150  and junior or senior standing, Required of all history majors in the fall semester of their senior year. 3 hour(s).
  
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    HIS 492 Senior Integration Paper in History


    Prerequisite(s): HIS 491  or permission of instructor. 3 hour(s). S.
  
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    IDS 201 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies


    This course will introduce the student to the nature of an academic discipline and will explore the integration of faith and learning in selected interdisciplinary studies. Research methods and theoretical approaches used in current interdisciplinary studies will be examined as a prolegomena to the IDS 492  Senior Integration Project. 3 hour(s). W.
  
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    IDS 202 Popular Culture


    This course is designed to help students understand the cultural ideas that shape their lives and influence their actions. Attention is focused on the music, people, and events that have played a major role in American culture since 1950. Time will also be spent critiquing popular media like movies, music, news, and MTV. The goal is to give students the necessary tools for living a life of full-orbed obedience to Jesus Christ. As society moves into the twenty-first century, today’s college students will assume leadership positions in families, churches, government, and careers. This course is designed to help prepare students to serve effectively by understanding the spirits of the age and how they seek students’ allegiance. 3 hour(s). S.
  
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    IDS 205 The Church and Social Concern


    A biblical, theological, and historical survey of the church’s response to social problems. Specific emphasis will be given to assessing the nature and extent of the church’s responsibility for addressing the varied dimensions of poverty. The course will include a strongly practical dimension where students, as members of Christ’s body, will identify specific approaches to personal application. 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 210 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies


    This course offers opportunities for study in various topics of an interdisciplinary nature. These may be short-term courses offered during the semester or during the summer term. Topics will be decided by the faculty member as the need and interest arise. Instructor determines credit hour(s).
  
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    IDS 310 Darwin


    The main purpose of this course is to understand the Utilitarian and Victorian worldviews which dominated 19th century England. Using Darwin’s autobiography and his diary, the student will have to reconstruct the Utilitarian worldview of Darwin when he departed on a circumglobal BNVC voyage on the Beagle. Once the student understands the utilitarian worldview, then the student is responsible to understand how it fits into the natural religion and political theory in Victorian England. This course is also offered as an elective in the History Department (HIS 336 ) and for the philosophy and religion major. 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 315 Religions and Social Theory of 19th Century Europe


    By the mid-19th century in Germany, there arose a sharp distinction between the methodology of the natural sciences and the human sciences. The human sciences maintained that they could not take their cue from the natural sciences which searched for general laws to explain phenomena. Rather, the human sciences wished to grasp the individual and unique features of sociocultural and historical phenomena. However, by what method does one come to interpret human action? Notable German scholars presented the method of inner human understanding (Verstehen). Hence, the purpose of this course will be to unfold the method of inner human understanding in the context of theology, language, history, philology, human sciences, phenomenology, existentialism, and anthropology. This course is also offered as an elective for the philosophy and religion major and an interdisciplinary studies sociology concentration. 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 320 Worldviews in Conflict


    The course acquaints students with the need for worldview thinking, with four worldviews of particular influence in the late twentieth and the twenty-first centuries (Marxism/Leninism, Secular humanism, New Age or Cosmic Humanism, and biblical Christianity) and with the worldviews’ implications for each of ten academic fields: theology, philosophy, ethics, biology, psychology, sociology, law, politics, economics, and history. Following the textbook, the course allows proponents of the competing views to describe and defend them; students are encouraged to think critically for themselves about evidences and arguments for and against the views. Important goals include developing critical thinking abilities, increasing understanding of competing worldviews and their implications, and heightened ability to explain and defend the Christian worldview and its implications. 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 335 The European Enlightenment


    Modernity is a complex intellectual historical issue among scholars. The student will attempt to understand some of the traits of modernity by examining major historiographical interpretations of the European Enlightenment as a social, political, religious, philosophical, and intellectual movement. This course is also offered as an elective in the History Department (HIS 335 ) and for the philosophy and religion major. 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 340 Augustine: Friendship and Society


    This course is a detailed examination of the teachings, life, and times of Aurelius Augustine of Hippo. Particular attention will be given to Augustine’s Confessions, and its potential for interdisciplinary interpretation(s). 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 345 Athletics, Sports and Religion in the Ancient World


    This course is an upper level interdisciplinary research course dealing with the topic of athletics, sports and religion in the Greco-Roman world of the New Testament and early Christianity. The Hellenistic gymnasium, and its attending institutions will serve as the focal point of class research and discussion. Greco-Roman games, sports, and athletic practices posed a significant challenge to the religious commitments and traditions of observant Jews and early Christians who often refused to participate in such pagan activities. Students will learn about the athletics in the Greco-Roman world and compare this background with some of the controversies and problems of sports and athletics both in the ancient world and today. Prerequisite(s): IDS 201 , BIB 277  and COR 225 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 347 Religion, Sexuality, and Love in the Ancient World


    The course will use an interdisciplinary approach to exploring the relationship between religion, sexuality and love in the ancient world, especially the world of the Bible. Thus, theology, biblical studies, literary analysis, archeological studies, art (special lecturer), history, and psychology (special lecturer) will be the primary disciplines used to explore this curricular topic. More specifically, the course will unfold both the human and divine conceptions of love, beauty, pleasure, sacred practices and the sexual ethics of men and women in biblical times. The subtopics of gender, rites of passage, love, courtship, marriage, divorce; adultery, human sexuality and especially, homosexuality will be the focus of readings and discussions. Prerequisite(s): IDS 201 , BIB 277 , COR 225  and junior standing. 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 350 Rhetoric in the European Tradition


    The course will present an intellectual-historical analysis of the background, setting, and evolution of Rhetoric from the Greeks to the modern era in European culture. Rhetoric will be critically appraised in the context of philosophy, grammar (the use of language), logic (dialectic), education, culture, politics (political oratory), history, and ecclesiology. 3 hour(s). S.
  
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    IDS 351 History and Culture of African Americans to 1865


    This course is an historical examination of the important experiences and achievements of African Americans. Primary attention will be given to the cultural, religious, social and political structures that have given shape to the history of African Americans. In the movement from Africa, to slavery and freedom in America, we will evaluate the successes and failures of selected African American groups and individuals that unfold the fabric of this history. 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 352 History and Culture of African Americans since 1865


    African-American History from the Civil War to the present is a multi-disciplinary study surveying the African-American experience and emphasizing historical, sociological, cultural, economic, and psychological issues in the study of African Americans since 1865. 3 hour(s).
  
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    IDS 360 Roots of Dutch Neo-Calvinism


    This course will study the liberating effects of the Enlightenment upon the Netherlands during the 19th century and how the Dutch Calvinists attempted to reestablish the Christian foundation and heritage of Dutch and European culture. These neo-Calvinists (Van Prinsterer, Kuyper, and Bavinck) wished that every aspect of the encyclopedia must be reformed, transformed, and restored for Jesus Christ (e.g. politics, arts, sciences, civil law). They created an all-encompassing Reformed worldview in which the Lordship of Christ is sovereign over every sphere of life. 3 hour(s).
  
  
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    IDS 400 Special Topics


    This course offers opportunities for study in various topics of interest within the field of interdisciplinary studies. These may be short-term courses offered during the semester or during the summer term. Topics will be decided upon by the Interdisciplinary Studies Department faculty as need and interest arise. Instructor determines credit hour(s).
  
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    IDS 492 Senior Integration Paper in Interdisciplinary Studies


    This is a senior seminar focused on interdisciplinary research and writing. All requirements and deadlines for the completion of an interdisciplinary senior project/paper are reviewed in this course. Students are expected to present their projects/papers and sustain an oral examination at the end of the course. 2 hour(s).
  
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    INS 211 International Studies Internship


    Off-campus work that utilizes academic skills developed through the international studies major and overseen by an organization recognized by the INS program committee. Additional requirements may apply. The INS internship may not be used for the fulfillment of elective hours in the major. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor,  POL 105 , a minimum overall GPA of 3.0, and at least one reference from the INS program faculty attesting to the quality of the student’s work and qualifications for the internship. 0-3 hour(s).
  
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    INS 411 International Studies Internship


    Off-campus work that utilizes academic skills developed through the international studies major and overseen by an organization recognized by the INS program committee. Additional requirements may apply. The INS internship may not be used for the fulfillment of elective hours in the major. Prerequisite(s): POL 105 , a minimum overall GPA of 3.0, and at least one reference from the INS program faculty attesting to the quality of the student’s work and qualifications for the internship. 1-3 hour(s).
  
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    INS 491 Senior Seminar in International Studies


    Work in this course is applied to the formulation and writing of the Senior Integration Paper. During the semester, students will produce a polished SIP proposal, a sizable working SIP bibliography, and a substantial essay on the topic of their SIP involving thoughtful and critical evaluation of appropriate sources. Required of all international studies majors in the fall semester of their senior year. Pre- or Co-requisite(s): POL 105 , POL 200 , POL 210 , ECO 201 , ECO 202 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    INS 492 Senior Integration Paper in International Studies


    Prerequisite(s): INS 491  or permission of instructor. 3 hour(s). S.
  
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    ISL 220 Introduction to Islam


    Introduces students to the history and primary texts of Islam and equips them to critically engage topics related to Islam with integrity and insight. A selective, but representative, survey of Muslim history moves from the cultural and religious context of late sixth century Arabia up to the present time. Textual study focuses on the Qur’an, sunna, hadith, and major schools of jurisprudence as they have been interpreted by Muslims over time. 3 hour(s). HUM
  
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    LIN 100 Studies in Language


    This course offers a non-technical introduction to the study of linguistics and is organized around common ideas and misconceptions about language. Students will assess evidence and opinions about a variety of popular linguistic topics, including bilingualism, language and gender, stigmatized dialects of English, language change, sign language, language disorders, language and thought, and animal communication. 3 hour(s). HUM
  
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    LIN 150 Introduction to Linguistics


    This course introduces students to the systematic study of human language. The course surveys the major subfields of linguistics: the study of sounds and sound patterns (phonetics and phonology); words and their parts (morphology); and the structure, meaning, and use of phrases and sentences (syntax, semantics, and pragmatics). The focus is on analyzing language data. Additional topics may include language learning, historical language change, and social aspects of language variation and use. 3 hour(s). SSC
  
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    LIN 210 Methods in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)


    This course integrates theory and practice in teaching English to speakers of other languages. Participants will assess a variety of language teaching methods, discuss pedagogical insights from current research on second language acquisition, create and present a portfolio of activities for teaching English, and examine features of English that are particularly challenging for learners. 3 hour(s).
  
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    LIN 300 TESOL Practicum


    A one-semester practicum in which students teach English to speakers of other languages. Students will keep a daily journal, develop classroom lessons or materials, work with English learners and peers, and experience a culture different from their own. Practicum must be approved by TESOL faculty. The practicum may be completed in the United States or abroad. Prerequisite(s): LIN 210   3 hour(s).
  
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    LIN 310 Syntax


    This course offers a systematic study of the structure of phrases and sentences. Students will gain practical experience forming and testing linguistic hypotheses using data from a variety of languages. The focus is more on analyzing language data and less on surveying the historical development of syntactic theory. Attention is also given to applications in language teaching and learning. Prerequisite(s): LIN 150   3 hour(s).
  
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    LIN 315 Phonology


    This course examines how speech sounds are organized within individual languages. Students will learn about the relationships between sounds and the ways sounds combine with and influence each other. The focus is on analyzing phonological data from diverse languages, including non-Indo-European languages. Attention is also given to applications in speech pathology, dialectology, language learning, and linguistic theory. Prerequisite(s): LIN 150   or FRE 320  SPA 320  GER 320   3 hour(s).
  
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    LIN 320 Second Language Acquisition


    This course provides an introduction to second language acquisition (SLA) research through exploring historical and contemporary SLA theories and methods.  In addition to investigating how and why humans acquire languages other than their native language, the course will also explore factors that influence second language acquisition. The theories and methods presented in the course will then be applied to learner data as well as foreign language teaching methodology. Prerequisite(s): LIN 150   3 hour(s).
  
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    LIN 401 Special Topics in Linguistics


    This course offers opportunities for concentration in advanced topics of interest within linguistics. Prerequisite(s): LIN 150  or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    LIN 402 Special Topics in TESOL


    This course offers opportunities for concentration in advanced topics of interest within foreign language teaching methodology or issues related to speakers of other languages who learn English. Prerequisite(s): LIN 150  or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    LIN 410 Sociolinguistics


    This course provides a study of language as social practice. The course highlights the ways language changes depending on the sociocultural context and emphasizes the interaction between language and social factors such as class, community, age, ethnicity, gender, power, and religion. Prerequisite(s): LIN 150  or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    LIN 415 Child Language Acquisition


    This course examines how children learn language. Emphasis is placed on the processes and stages of language development in early childhood, current empirical findings in the field, and theoretical issues surrounding language acquisition. Students will also gain practical experience collecting and analyzing child language data. Prerequisite(s): LIN 150  or PSY 303  or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    LIN 450 Psycholinguistics


    This course examines the mental processes involved in understanding, producing, and learning language. Topics include the comprehension of spoken and written language, speech perception and production, word recognition, mental representation of language, the influence of language on cognition, bilingualism, aphasia, dyslexia, and research methods in psycholinguistics. This course focuses primarily on adult language, making occasional comparisons with child language. Prerequisite(s): LIN 150  or PSY 261 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 040 Intermediate Algebra


    A review of elementary and intermediate algebra designed to assist students in developing the skills necessary for taking MAT 141  College Algebra. Only offered on a credit/no credit basis, where hours do not apply toward the 126 earned hours degree requirement. Prerequisite(s): Placement level 1. 4 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 111 Mathematics for Educators I


    This course is the first of a two-course sequence of mathematics content courses (not methods course) designed to prepare students to teach elementary and middle school mathematics for understanding, as envisioned by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and as described in their document Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. The courses will examine deeply those topics in mathematics which are relevant for elementary and middle school teaching. MAT 111 focuses on problem solving and arithmetic including why standard algorithms work, properties of arithmetic, and applications of elementary mathematics. Prerequisite(s): Note: These courses (MAT 111 and MAT 112 ) only fulfill the core mathematics requirement for an elementary education major. These courses are not equivalent to either MAT 122  or MAT 141 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 112 Mathematics for Educators II


    This course is the second of a two-course sequence of mathematics content courses (not methods course) designed to prepare students to teach elementary and middle school mathematics for understanding, as envisioned by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and as described in their document Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. The courses will examine deeply those topics in mathematics which are relevant for elementary and middle school teaching. MAT 112 focuses on problem solving and geometry including why various standard formulas and properties in geometry are valid. Prerequisite(s): MAT 111 . These courses (MAT 111  and MAT 112) only fulfill the core mathematics requirement for an elementary education major. These courses are not equivalent to either MAT 122  or MAT 141 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 122 Concepts in Mathematics


    This course will introduce a variety of topics chosen from the following: Number systems, finite and infinite sets, geometry, topology, chaos theory, probability, and game theory. This course aims to help students to develop an appreciation for the beauty of mathematics, and for the usefulness of mathematical thinking, by examining particularly surprising results in classical and contemporary mathematics. Prerequisite(s): Placement level 1. This course fulfills the core mathematics requirement for non-science majors, but does not serve as a prerequisite for any other course. 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 141 College Algebra


    The course will cover complex numbers, solution of equations and inequalities, techniques of graphing, and the study of various functions: linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic. Designed for those who have had two years of high school algebra, but need more depth in algebraic topics to prepare for enrollment in MAT 142 , MAT 144  or STA 253 . Prerequisite(s): MAT 040  or placement level 2. This course fulfills the core mathematics requirement; not open to students with credit for any mathematics course (or equivalent) numbered 142 or higher unless special permission is granted by the instructor. 4 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 142 Precalculus Mathematics


    The course will cover analytical trigonometry, systems of equations, matrices and determinants, linear programming, solution of polynomial equations, conic sections, mathematical induction, the binomial theorem, permutations and combinations, and introductory probability. Designed to meet the requirements of various major programs (including biology, business and elementary education/middle grades certification), and to provide preparation for the calculus sequence. Prerequisite(s): MAT 141  or placement level 3; not open to students with credit for any mathematics course (or equivalent) numbered 145 or higher unless special permission is granted by the instructor. 4 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 144 Finite Mathematics and Brief Calculus for Business Majors


    The course will cover systems of linear equations, linear programming, mathematics of finance, and elementary differential and integral calculus. Emphasis placed on applications to finance and management problems. Prerequisite(s): MAT 141  or placement level 3. 4 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 145 Calculus I


    The course will cover analytic geometry, functions and limits, the derivative and its applications, antiderivatives, indefinite integrals, transcendental functions, the definite integral and its application, methods of integration, polar coordinates and infinite series. These courses are prerequisites to all courses numbered above 200 Prerequisite(s): MAT 142  or placement level 4 for MAT 145; MAT 145 or placement level 5 for MAT 146 . 4 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 146 Calculus II


    The course will cover analytic geometry, functions and limits, the derivative and its applications, antiderivatives, indefinite integrals, transcendental functions, the definite integral and its application, methods of integration, polar coordinates and infinite series. These courses are prerequisites to all courses numbered above 200 Prerequisite(s): MAT 142  or placement level 4 for MAT 145 ; MAT 145  or placement level 5 for MAT 146. 4 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 247 Calculus III


    A continuation of MAT 145  -MAT 146 . The course will cover vectors, parametric equations, solid analytic geometry, partial differentiation, multiple integration, line and surface integrals. Prerequisite(s): MAT 146 . 4 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 250 Probability


    An introduction to the theory of probability. The course will cover combinatorics, laws of probability, discrete and continuous random variables and distributions, expectation, variance, and if time permits, other topics. Prerequisite(s): MAT 247 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 258 Differential Equations


    The course will cover first order differential equations, second and higher order linear equations, series solutions, the Laplace transform, systems of first order equations, linear second order boundary value problems. Both analytic and numerical techniques are studied. Prerequisite(s): MAT 146 . 4 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 270 Discrete Mathematics


    The course will cover counting, permutations, combinations, discrete probability distributions, generating functions, Ramsey Theory, the pigeonhole principle, induction, various algorithms, topics in graph theory including: connectivity, trees, Euler tours, Hamilton cycles, edge and vertex coloring, planar graphs and graph algorithms. Prerequisite(s): MAT 145 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 290 Proofs and Exposition


    Proofs in mathematics are both intimidating and mysterious to most people. This course hopes to dispel some of that mystery as well as equip students to both read and write mathematical proofs. Besides a review of logic and mathematical nomenclature, students will be required to tackle proofs from a variety of different fields of mathematics. Prerequisite(s): MAT 146 . 3 hour(s). S, W.
  
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    MAT 310 Linear Algebra


    This course will develop the algebra of vectors and matrices, including finding the inverse of a matrix, subspaces, basis and dimension of vector spaces, linear transformations, isomorphisms. Inner and cross products will be treated. Special types of matrices will be discussed, such as the Jordan Normal form. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors will be treated. Prerequisite(s): MAT 146 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 350 Modern Algebra


    The course will cover integral domains, rings, fields, groups, elementary number theory, and other selected topics. Prerequisite(s): MAT 290  or permission of instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 360 Modern Geometry I


    The objective of this course is to teach students axiomatic reasoning without the aid of diagrams, explore what can be deduced from neutral geometry (without the Euclidean Fifth Postulate, or, equivalently, the Hilbert Parallel Axiom for Euclidean Geometry), explore aspects of Euclidean Geometry, then, replace the Euclidean Fifth Postulate with the Hyperbolic Parallel Postulate, and show that Hyperbolic Geometry is as self-consistent as Euclidean Geometry. The historical developments, philosophical implications and Hyperbolic Trigonometry should be of particular use to future secondary education mathematics instructors. Prerequisite(s): MAT 290  or permission of instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 361 Modern Geometry II


    The objective of this course is to teach students axiomatic reasoning without the aid of diagrams, explore what can be deduced from neutral geometry (without the Euclidean Fifth Postulate, or, equivalently, the Hilbert Parallel Axiom for Euclidean Geometry), explore aspects of Euclidean Geometry, then, replace the Euclidean Fifth Postulate with the Hyperbolic Parallel Postulate, and show that Hyperbolic Geometry is as self-consistent as Euclidean Geometry. The historical developments, philosophical implications and Hyperbolic Trigonometry should be of particular use to future secondary education mathematics instructors. Prerequisite(s): MAT 360 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 410 Mathematical Logic


    The course will cover truth functions and tables, rules of logic, predicate calculus, first order arithmetic, formal set theory, consistency, completeness, recursive functions, and if time permits, Godel Numbers, Godel’s Incompleteness Theorem, algorithms, computability, Church’s Thesis, Turing machines, undecidability of formal systems and the halting problem. Prerequisite(s): MAT 290  3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 460 Real Analysis


    The course will cover set theory, the real number system, functions, sequences, limits, convergence, uniform convergence, Bolzano-Wierstrass Theorem, functions of a real variable, open and closed sets, continuity, uniform continuity, connectivity of the real numbers, the intermediate value theorem, completeness, compactness, the mean value theorem, differentiation, Riemann integration, and if time permits, other topics. Prerequisite(s): MAT 290  and MAT 258 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 470 Topology


    Review of set theory and logic, defining axioms of topological spaces, bases for topological spaces, order, product and subspace topology, closed sets and limit points, continuous functions, metric topology, connectivity, compactness, the Tychonoff Theorem, and if time permits, other topics. Prerequisite(s): MAT 290 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MAT 480 Advanced Topics in Mathematics


    Topics are considered in number theory, operations research, mathematical statistics, or advanced calculus, depending on student demand. Prerequisite(s): MAT 290 . 3 hour(s).
  
  
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    MIS 202 Theology of Missions


    A study of biblical and extra-biblical covenants will be made to see the importance of the covenant concept to the revelation of redemption; the basis of missions as lying in a covenant-centered theology of missions; the doctrines of election, atonement, love of God, common grace, and free offer of the gospel in relation to missions. Prerequisite(s): BIB 111 , BIB 142 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MIS 203 Missionary Methods and Problems


    Methods of conducting the missionary effort in foreign countries will be studied in relation to such matters as communications, elenctics, identification, unacceptable accommodation, the support and government of local churches, the problem of church and state, and various types of missionary endeavors. Prerequisite(s): BIB 111 , BIB 142 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MIS 302 World Religions


    An analytical and critical appraisal of the major non-Christian religious ideologies of animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Shintoism, Islam, and Judaism. Emphasis will be placed on the world and life views with which their followers confront the missionary. Prerequisite(s): BIB 277 , BIB 278 . 3 hour(s).
  
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    MIS 404 Missions Practicum


    Students may receive up to three hours of credit for work done in connection with a variety of summer service programs sponsored by Mission to the World (the foreign missions agency of the Presbyterian Church in America) or other approved agencies. Requirements vary according to the agency and project. 1-3 hour(s).
  
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    MKT 300 Principles of Marketing


    The study of consumer and industrial markets and the formulation of marketing policies and strategies relating to product, price, channels of distribution and promotion are stressed. The course seeks to explore fashion and life cycles and consumer behavior as well as the legal and institutional environment of marketing. Prerequisite(s): ENG 111 ; Common Business Core and Junior standing. 3 hour(s).
  
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    MKT 332 Consumer Behavior


    An analysis of consumer motivation, purchase decisions, market adjustment, and product innovation, including a survey of related explanatory theories. Prerequisite(s): MKT 300 . 3 hour(s).
  
  •  

    MKT 335 Promotion


    A study of the dimensions of promotional marketing, including advertising, personal selling, public relations, and sales promotion. Prerequisite(s): MKT 300  or PSE 308 . 3 hour(s).
  
  •  

    MKT 410 Marketing Research


    A course designed to give students a basic understanding of the value and techniques of marketing research. Prerequisite(s): MKT 300 . 3 hour(s).
  
  •  

    MKT 415 Marketing Management


    An integrative course of a student’s knowledge of markets and marketing programs from the market manager’s point of view. Prerequisite(s): MKT 300  and six additional credit hours in marketing or permission of the instructor. 3 hour(s).
  
  •  

    MKT 499 Selected Topics


    Course content determined by special student needs. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Instructor determines credit hour(s).
  
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    MSP 143 The Character of Leadership


    A study of important characteristics of effective leaders, both in theory and in the lives of great leaders throughout history. Required of freshman Maclellan Scholars, fall semester. 3 hour(s).
 

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